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Eyes Health Care Blog

What is the cornea's eyes?

The cornea is the outermost part of the eye. It consists of thin cell layers. It's clear we can not see it. The first structure of the eye is a brown blue or green iris. Iris gives the eye color. The cornea is transparent as the car's windscreen. When we are at different times of the day, we must see from afar. The windscreen must always be clean. Dust or rain can damage our abilities. Likewise, the cornea should always be clarified.

The cornea is shaped by nature in a masterly manner. Even the most expensive manmade lenses are not able to meet the accuracy of the function and self-preservation. The smoothness and shape of the cornea are of the same critical importance to its proper functioning as to its transparency. If the surface smoothness or corneal quality changes, vision is compromised.

The light passes through the pure cornea to the retina in the back of the eye. A healthy, clean cornea is required for perfectly clear vision. Sometimes the cornea is called "window". Occasionally, as a result of condition or injury, corneal tissue is damaged to a point where light can not pass on it and result in decreased vision.

Although it looks like a transparent membrane, the cornea actually consists of five different layers, each of which has its own function. Thin outer layer or epithelium is a reliable obstacle to corneal infection. It should normally cause injury before the contagious representative can start skirmish between the corneal layers (stroma). The underlayer layer is a fibrous tape called Bowman Membrane. It is important for corneal integrity. The third layer consists of collagen, connective tissue. This makes up eighty percent of the cornea. There are cells beside collagen fibrils, which can be called keratocytes. The density of the fibers is higher than that of the Bowman membrane. Under the stroma again is a fibrous layer. It is called Descemet's membrane. This scaffold is for the upper layer of Endothelium cells.

When endothelial cells are healthy and balanced, they serve as a leak system to provide the corneal nutrition. In other words, these cells allow fluid from the inside of the eye to leak into the cornea (liquid food). Once the corneal cells are actually fed, the cells pump the fluid out of the cornea. If the endothel pump is compromised for any reason, the cornea will surely exceed hydration and become obscure. This is most commonly occurring in patients who have had severe endothelial lesions in a complex catastrophe or patients who are actually patients with corneal endothelium called Fuchs' Endothelial Dystrophy

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  • Published On : 5 months ago on March 10, 2018
  • Author By :
  • Last Updated : March 10, 2018 @ 8:16 pm
  • In The Categories Of : Uncategorized

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