Healthy Life

Eyes Health Care Blog

Which glasses are right for me? Bifocal, progressive or single-sided reading glasses?

It's great to be over 40 years old.

No, 40 is not really the new 20. This is because every 40 years you actually come to yourself, personally and professionally, 20. Your 40s are indeed. You must have made mistakes. Who does not? But now that she is over 40, she finds that she actually learns her mistakes, not the same thing over and over again.

But at the point you begin to make your move, you will begin to notice that some things physically do not work as well as before.

For example, like your eyes.

It used to be that when you were younger, whether short-sighted, distant or perfect, your eyes could be seen from afar and close to the eye, whether you were looking at an apparent glasses or not. But now that you've entered the fifth decade, a strange thing happened. You realize you can not see things close to you, just as you did before.

Read a guide to this guide? No way.

Instructions on the liqueur glass? Fuggedaboutit.

Now you can find that you're constantly moving around trying to read back and forth when you try to find the exact position where you can see it clearly. You do this so much that you start to feel like a trombone player.

You do not want to admit it, but you know this is true. It's time to start thinking of multifocal glasses. Or at least reading glasses.

What do you get? If you wear glasses to correct your short-sighted or generous vision, the first thing that is likely to arise in your mind is bifocal. But then you remember, grandmother, swirling, knitting, and "Matlock".

Not me, you say to yourself. I do not want people to look at me, seeing the line from my glasses and thinking, "Forward." You've heard there are things like non-linear bifocals, or multi-stage glasses, the progressives, but you're not sure. You've heard some people find it difficult to find their visual sweet spot.

So you have a special eye view, distance, computer and reading attitude. But if you wear corrective lenses, you do not have to worry about using several pair of glasses. – Are the glasses in the house scattered? Uh-uh. – Do you read the glasses on the chain? Even more pronounced: Uh-uh. The dreaded picture comes again: Grandma.

Do not worry. Not the grandmother. You have been missing from early bird breeds for years at Denny. You just need some help with your presbyopia.

What is mine? All right, we'll explain. When you are young and the eye muscles are flexible, they are easily enlarged and contracted to allow the eyepiece to deform to allow clear objects to be visible.

This process is called accommodation.

But after doing the muscles of the eye for 40 years, they are a little tired and stiff than the other muscles. As a result, your eyes can no longer be extended and contracted so easily to allow you to stay.

This is a state of presbyopia.

If you have it, and if you touch the forty years, there is no way you will need some kind of reading zoom performance. So look at the different options and see what's right for you.

Again, if you are wearing corrective glasses, multifocal lenses are probably the best solution. So start bifocal.

People who love bifocals prefer their distance and vision that are clearly separated with a visible line. They do not care about it, or they are less concerned about what this age is. However, people who do not like bifocal correction complain about the phenomenon known as the "picture jumping", which refers to a sudden switch from distant to near vision, which can cause misperception.

Presbyopians who want to use a smoother mixture between distance and near vision prefer to prefer multifocal lenses and have no visible line separating the larger distance and the smaller close segment. These invisible lines are called bifocal (or more precisely, multifocal) progressives.

This is because vision is "moving" from distance to vision and there is no picture jumping. In addition, a portion of the lens provides intermediate or computer vision between the lens part of the lens and the portion exposed to near vision.

Let's look at these non-line multifocal lenses a bit closer. Progressive ones can also be referred to as non-linear threefolds because the lens contains three field of view and no visible line separates them. It's great to cover the need to wear "old eyeglasses," but it's costly. Literally, since progressive eyewear is usually more expensive than single or bifocal spectacles. But there are also aspects that need to be taken into account for the lens correction.

The bifocal reading segmental lens, as noted, is approximately 28 mm in diameter. But for the progressive, the reading segment's lens is about half, about 14 millimeters. Additionally, there is no visible correction on both sides of the lens reading section.

To understand how a progressive lens develops, think of a mushroom.

Imagine that the cap is the spacer of the lens. Consider the stem of the fungus as the intermediate and reading part of the lens, about 14 millimeters wide. People who prefer the broader reading segment provided by the bifocal lenses often feel that progressive lenses do not provide a wide wide-ranging reading corridor.

Progressives will never work. Some people respond negatively to the lack of visible line separating the three focal fields, during dizziness or progressive behavior. Most of the first wearers of progressive glasses disappear in a few minutes or a few days.

For some people, however, the discomfort they experience as progressive behavior never goes away. Additionally, a pair of multifocal spectacles, bifocal or progressive pair can wear for some people, according to research published by Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science. This study found that people wearing bifocal or progressive eyeglasses are more than doubled over wearing multiple glasses than wearing a glasses spectacles. This increases when the wearer is walking downstairs.

People who find it difficult to maintain their balance when wearing multifocal goggles or who have tried and disliked bifocals and progressives would most likely be better off with the pair of separate eyeglasses.

Unique spacer glasses are used to allow distances of about two meters or more. Appearing intermediate (computer) spectacles can be used to view distances between one and two and a half meters away, basically depending on how far you are from a computer screen. One-by-one proximity (reading glasses) serves to view objects that are six inches and one and a half feet apart, rough where reading books.

Progressives will never work. Some people respond negatively to the lack of visible line separating the three focal fields, during dizziness or progressive behavior. Most of the first wearers of progressive glasses disappear in a few minutes or a few days.

For some people, however, the discomfort they experience as progressive behavior never goes away. Additionally, a pair of multifocal spectacles, bifocal or progressive pair can wear for some people, according to research published by Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science. This study found that people wearing bifocal or progressive eyeglasses are more than twice as likely to wear multiple glasses when wearing spectacle glasses. This increases when the wearer is walking downstairs.

People who find it difficult to maintain their balance when wearing multifocal goggles or who have tried and disliked bifocals and progressives would most likely be better off with the pair of separate eyeglasses.

Unique spacer glasses are used to allow distances of about two meters or more. Appearing intermediate (computer) spectacles can be used to view distances between one and two and a half meters away, basically depending on how far you are from a computer screen. One-by-one proximity (reading glasses) serves to view objects that are six inches and one and a half feet apart, rough where reading books.

For a spectacle glasses only the plus or minus numbers are required in the sphere (abbreviated SPH ), [196459036] and ] AXIS sections. Ignore the extra number (this is the same for both eyes) in the NV N V ADDITION section until there is intermediate interlocking and reading glasses.

For single-sided reading glasses, it's a bit more complicated, though it requires only a small elementary arithmetic. Add the extra number in the NV-ADD section of your recipe and add it to the numbers in the SPH section. For example, if SPs -1.00 and +2.00 are in NV-ADD when adding these two numbers, the SPH section will be +1.00. It is near one vision.

Do not forget to place single-eyed reading glasses, reduce long distance vision (PD ). PD is a millimeter measurement between a student's middle part and the other center.

If there is a single PD number that is between 50 and 75, the three numbers are subtracted. For example, say that remote vision is DP 63. This reduction is three -60 for single-sided reading glasses.

However, there may be a double PD that measures the center of each student to the center of the nose bridge. In this case, you have two numbers, each from the mid 20's to the mid-thirties. These two numbers must be added to the single PD number. For example, if the double PD value is 31.5 in the right eye and 31.5 in the left, the PD value rises to 63. Then, for the viewing angle PD, the PD of the single-reader eye eye is one-and-a-half times as the combination of the two results in three numbers. That would be 60, just like if you have a single PD.

For single intermediate (computer) glasses, if NV-ADD is numbered and divided by half (+2.00 divided by 2 = 1.00), add this to -1.00 SPH (+1.00 + -1.00 = 0.00), you get the intermediate (computer) self-esteem. You do not have to change PD at all, but you can reduce it by one or two millimeters if you have a high PD (over 66).

If you want to reinvent the recipe with a bifocal pair to get a computer vision at the top of your lens and read the vision below, then do the same thing you use for a single glasses spectacle.

Divide the NV-ADD halfway and add the half number to the SPHs. But this time leave the reminder in the NV-ADD section. This means that in the upper part of the lenses you will receive computer vision and read the vision below.

This is so simple.

  • Published On : 7 months ago on March 12, 2018
  • Author By :
  • Last Updated : March 12, 2018 @ 7:50 am
  • In The Categories Of : Uncategorized

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

';